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Weekly Update #6 October 18-22

Tuesday, October 19th, 2021 – Picture Day

Thursday, October 21st, 2021

 Scholastic Book Fair Begins

Advanced Placement Parent Information Night for grade 8 parents    http://secondary.hcdsb.org/ctk/

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) INFORMATION NIGHT

Grade 7 and 8 parents are invited to attend a pre-recorded presentation for information on Advanced Placement.  The presentation is scheduled for Thursday, October 21st @6:30pm

Parents must register at:  https://forms.office.com/r/tmigttAepx .  All parents who register for the presentation will be send a link.

GRADE 8 PARENT INFORMATION NIGHT

Information on registering for grade 9 at Christ the King Catholic Secondary School can be found on the Christ the King Website.  Parents will have access to a pre-recorded presentation that will be posted on the website and twitter.  The presentation is Thursday, October 28th at 6:30 pm

ITEMS DROPPED OFF AT THE SCHOOL

Any parent dropping off items during the school day should buzz the office when they arrive.  You will be asked to leave the item on the table in the foyer.  All items dropped off during the school day must have your child(ren) first and last name visible.

HALLOWEEN SPOOK-TAC-ULAR DANCE

We are very excited to hold our first school-wide event, the Spook-tac-ular Dance on Friday, October 29th, 2021.  For Halloween this year, students will be able to come to school dressed in their costumesWe will have Halloween inflatables at the back of the school and students will have the opportunity to show off their costumes and take part in a Spook-tac-ular  Dance and have some fun outside with their class cohort during a designated time outside.  All students who make donations will be eligible to have their names entered into a draw for a gift card.

The following are suggested questions to reflect on when choosing a costume to avoid being disrespectful or offensive:

  • Is my costume making fun of a group of people, their culture or religion?
  • Does my costume reinforce jokes and stereotypes about certain groups, cultures or religions?
  • Am I altering my skin color, facial/body features to make it darker or like a particular race, ethnicity, or cultural group?
  • Am I dressing up as a culture or borrowing from a religion that is not my own or is not part of my background?
  • Do I understand and respect the history or tradition of the culture that I am borrowing my costume from
  • Parents/Guardians are asked to NOT send in ANY treats or any items such as Halloween erasers, pencils, or toys that would need to be distributed to students in the class. With Covid, it is just too complicated. We are trying to be extra cautious and not having students trade snacks or “treats” or even pencils and erasers could potentially pose a problem. We will be sure that the students have fun at school listening to music outside in their costumes. Thank you very much for respecting the health and safety of our students and staff.

OCTOBER CULTURAL EVENTS

Autism Awareness Month

Throughout October (and the rest of the year), you may come across some different symbols that represent autism awareness and acceptance, such as: a puzzle-piece, a multi-colored ribbon, tie-dye, or a noticeable display of the color blue. Anytime you see one of these symbols, we encourage you to imagine how life might be different for someone with autism, or someone in their family, and think of how you could show your support – to that person or their family directly, or through participation within your community.

National Day of Action for Missing and Murdered Women and GIrls

On October 4 we commemorate the National Day of Action for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.  In 2021, with the discoveries of over 1,500 children who were taken from their families and buried in residential ‘school’ grave sites and the knowledge that there are very likely many more to be found, it is more important than ever to cast a light on seeking adequate resources to find and take seriously missing person cases which are overrepresented in Indigenous communities and specifically among Indigenous women, girls, children and LGBTQ2SIA+ peoples. 

​​Latin Hispanic Heritage Month

​​Latin Hispanic Heritage Month (in Ontario) is an opportunity to remember, celebrate and educate future generations about the outstanding achievements and contributions of Hispanic people in the province. Ontario is home to more than 400,000 first-, second-and third-generation Canadians of Hispanic origin. As early as 1914, Canadians who originated from 23 Hispanic countries began immigrating to the province and today the Hispanic community is one of the fastest-growing in Ontario. Hispanic-Canadians represent a dynamic community that has made significant contributions to the growth and prosperity of the Province of Ontario.

Mental Health Awareness Month

The overall objective of World Mental Health Day is to raise awareness of mental health issues around the world and to mobilize efforts in support of mental health. The Day provides an opportunity for all stakeholders working on mental health issues to talk about their work, and what more needs to be done to make mental health care a reality for people worldwide.

Women’s History Month

Women’s History Month is celebrated annually throughout October. This period is set aside to give Canadians an opportunity to celebrate the amazing women in the country’s history. The Canadian Government designated October as Women’s History Month in 1992 after a successful lobbying campaign started by Lyn Gough, a historian and author of a book that highlights the pioneers in the Women’s Temperance Movement. The campaign was led by Gough herself, alongside Kathy Blasco and Katherine (Kay)  Armstrong, and included other women like Avis Rasmussen,Catherine Draper, and Sylvia Bagshaw.

Foster, JudyWeekly Update #6 October 18-22